Quick Answer: What Class Of Drug Is Atropine?

What happens if you give too much atropine?

Excess doses of atropine sulfate may cause side effects such as palpitations, dilated pupils, difficulty swallowing, hot dry skin, thirst, dizziness, restlessness, tremor, fatigue, and problems with coordination..

When would atropine be given?

Atropine is the first-line therapy (Class IIa) for symptomatic bradycardia in the absence of reversible causes. Treatments for bradydysrhythmias are indicated when there is a structural disease of the infra-nodal system or if the heart rate is less than 50 beats/min with unstable vital signs.

What is the generic name for atropine?

GENERIC NAME: ATROPINE SULFATE – OPHTHALMIC (AT-roe-peen SUL-fate)

What are the side effects of atropine sulfate?

Side EffectsBlurred vision.change in color vision.difficulty seeing at night.eye pain or stinging.fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse.increased sensitivity of the eyes to sunlight.

Why is atropine given?

Atropine is used to help reduce saliva, mucus, or other secretions in your airway during a surgery. Atropine is also used to treat spasms in the stomach, intestines, bladder, or other organs. Atropine is sometimes used as an antidote to treat certain types of poisoning.

What is the drug atropine used for?

Atropine is a prescription medicine used to treat the symptoms of low heart rate (bradycardia), reduce salivation and bronchial secretions before surgery or as an antidote for overdose of cholinergic drugs or mushroom poisoning.

When should Atropine not be given?

Atropine should be avoided with bradycardia caused by hypothermia and, in most cases, it will not be effective for Mobitz type II/Second-degree block type 2 or complete heart block.

Does atropine raise blood pressure?

However, when given by itself, atropine does not exert a striking or uniform effect on blood vessels or blood pressure. Systemic doses slightly raise systolic and lower diastolic pressures and can produce significant postural hypotension.

What are the contraindications of atropine?

The following conditions are contraindicated with this drug….Who should not take Atropine SULFATE Syringe?myasthenia gravis.a skeletal muscle disorder.high blood pressure.chronic heart failure.a change in saliva secretion.reflux esophagitis.or inflammation of the esophagus from backflow of stomach acid.hiatal hernia.More items…

How long does it take for atropine to wear off?

The blurred vision, caused by the atropine, will last for approximately seven days after the last instillation. The dilated pupil may remain for as long as 14 days. Are there any side effects?

How does atropine speed up the heart?

By blocking parasympathetic (vagal) action on the heart, atropine increases the rate of discharge by the sinus node. Enhances conduction through the atrioventricular (AV) junction. Accelerates the heart rate, therby improving cardiac output.

Where do you inject atropine?

Atropine is injected into a muscle, under the skin, or as an infusion into a vein. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

What class of drug is atropine sulfate?

It belongs to a class of drugs known as anticholinergics. Atropine works by widening (dilating) the pupil of the eye.

What is atropine in pharmacology?

Specific Drugs and Therapeutic Indications Atropine is a muscarinic receptor antagonist that is used to inhibit the effects of excessive vagal activation on the heart, which is manifested as sinus bradycardia and AV nodal block.

Is atropine a narcotic?

Although diphenoxylate is chemically related to narcotics, it does not have pain- relieving (analgesic) actions like most other narcotics. In higher doses, however, like other narcotics, diphenoxylate can cause euphoria (elevation of mood) and physical dependence.

What effect does atropine have on the body?

The use of atropine in cardiovascular disorders is mainly in the management of patients with bradycardia. Atropine increases the heart rate and improves the atrioventricular conduction by blocking the parasympathetic influences on the heart.

Why is atropine poisonous?

Ingestion of as little as a few drops of atropine in eye drop formulation can cause anticholinergic, or more specifically antimuscarinic, toxicity. The antimuscarinic toxidrome results from blockade of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at central and peripheral muscarinic receptors.

How many mg is atropine?

In severe cases, the initial dose can be as large as 2 to 6 mg administered IV. Repeat doses of 2 to 6 mg can be administered IV or IM every 5 to 60 minutes. Up to 50 mg of atropine may be necessary in the first 24 hours.

How does atropine work?

In cardiac uses, it works as a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholinergic antagonist, increasing firing of the sinoatrial node (SA) and conduction through the atrioventricular node (AV) of the heart, opposes the actions of the vagus nerve, blocks acetylcholine receptor sites, and decreases bronchial secretions.

Does atropine slow heart rate?

Atropine can cause bradycardia. Atropine has complex effects on heart rate: At low doses, atropine blocks M1 acetylcholine receptors in the parasympathetic ganglion controlling the SA node. This decreases heart rate (Bernheim 2004).