What Is Universal Blood And Body Fluid Precautions?

What is the difference between universal precautions and body substance isolation?

Standard precautions were developed by the CDC to synthesize the major features of universal precautions, which were designed to reduce the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens, and body substance isolation, which was designed to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens from moist body substances..

What PPE is required for standard precautions?

Standard precautions consist of the following practices: hand hygiene before and after all patient contact. the use of personal protective equipment, which may include gloves, impermeable gowns, plastic aprons, masks, face shields and eye protection. the safe use and disposal of sharps.

What are the 5 moments for hand hygiene?

My 5 Moments for Hand Hygienebefore touching a patient,before clean/aseptic procedures,after body fluid exposure/risk,after touching a patient, and.after touching patient surroundings.

What are the 5 universal precautions?

5 Steps of Universal PrecautionsEducation.Hand washing.Use of protective barriers (Personal Protective Equipment (PPE))Cleaning of contaminated surfaces.Safe handling/disposal of contaminated material.

What do you do if you are exposed to blood or body fluids?

Wash the area with warm water and soap. If you are splashed with blood or body fluids and your skin has an open wound, healing sore, or scratch, wash the area well with soap and water. If you are splashed in the eyes, nose or mouth, rinse well with water. If you have been bitten, wash the wound with soap and water.

What is standard precautions infection control?

Standard precautions are a set of infection control practices used to prevent transmission of diseases that can be acquired by contact with blood, body fluids, non-intact skin (including rashes), and mucous membranes.

Why is standard precautions important?

Standard precautions are meant to reduce the risk of transmission of bloodborne and other pathogens from both recognized and unrecognized sources. They are the basic level of infection control precautions which are to be used, as a minimum, in the care of all patients.

What are 3 universal precautions when dealing with body fluids?

Universal precautions do not apply to feces, nasal secretions, sputum, sweat, tears, urine, and vomitus unless they contain visible blood. The risk of transmission of HIV and HBV from these fluids and materials is extremely low or nonexistent.

What is the best way to prevent the spread of infection?

Decrease your risk of infecting yourself or others:Wash your hands often. … Get vaccinated. … Use antibiotics sensibly. … Stay at home if you have signs and symptoms of an infection. … Be smart about food preparation. … Disinfect the ‘hot zones’ in your residence. … Practice safer sex. … Don’t share personal items.More items…

What are 3 types of transmission based precautions?

There are three categories of Transmission-Based Precautions: Contact Precautions, Droplet Precautions, and Airborne Precautions.

What types of patients require blood and body fluid precautions?

Blood and body fluid precautions are recommendations designed to prevent the transmission of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and other diseases while giving first aid or other health care that includes contact with body fluids or blood.

What are the 4 main universal precautions?

Standard Precautions apply to 1) blood; 2) all body fluids, secretions, and excretions, except sweat, regardless of whether or not they contain visible blood; 3) non-intact skin; and 4) mucous membranes.

What are the 10 standard precautions?

Standard PrecautionsHand hygiene.Use of personal protective equipment (e.g., gloves, masks, eyewear).Respiratory hygiene / cough etiquette.Sharps safety (engineering and work practice controls).Safe injection practices (i.e., aseptic technique for parenteral medications).Sterile instruments and devices.More items…

What are the 4 major body fluids?

Compartments by locationIntracellular fluid.Extracellular fluid. Intravascular fluid (blood plasma) Interstitial fluid. Lymphatic fluid (sometimes included in interstitial fluid) Transcellular fluid.

What is the only body fluid that is not considered infectious?

Feces, nasal secretions, saliva, sputum, sweat, tears, urine, and vomitus are not considered potentially infectious unless they are visibly bloody.